Lily Allen makes dig at music industry

No Shame

Lily Allen has hinted there may be trouble with her new album No Shame.

Lily’s last release was 2014’s Sheezus, which hit the top of the U.K. albums chart, though received mixed reviews from critics. The singer announced in January (18) that she was gearing up to release No Shame in “early summer 2018”, though a cryptic Twitter post has left fans wondering if there are problems with the 32-year-old’s new music. “When people ask why my album is taking so long,” she tweeted on Tuesday (27Feb18), next to a link to a Guardian article titled “Madonna and Grimes lay bare cost of creative freedom for female artists”. Over the weekend both Madonna and Canadian musician Grimes took to social media to vent their frustrations at the current state of the music industry.

20th anniversary

Underneath a video of music trailblazer Madonna, her manager Guy Oseary marked the 20th anniversary of her album Ray of Light by posting a glowing tribute to the record.

“Can you help me now please!!” Madonna commented, before adding: “Remember when I made records with other artists from beginning to end and I was allowed to be a visionary and not have to go to song writing camps where no one can sit still for more than 15 minutes.” Grimes had a similar outburst, writing online that she was working on two albums, “One final album for my s**t label”, followed by another “on a label of my choosing”. The 29-year-old is signed to independent label 4AD, and recently hit out at her management in a now-deleted tweet to a fan. “indie music is more about egos than money. if u hurt someone’s ego, they don’t mind forgoing what you are potentially worth to them to take u down (sic),” she fumed.

Remember when

Grimes had a similar outburst, writing online that she was working on two albums, “One final album for my s**t label”, followed by another “on a label of my choosing”.

Underneath a video of music trailblazer Madonna, her manager Guy Oseary marked the 20th anniversary of her album Ray of Light by posting a glowing tribute to the record. “Can you help me now please!!” Madonna commented, before adding: “Remember when I made records with other artists from beginning to end and I was allowed to be a visionary and not have to go to song writing camps where no one can sit still for more than 15 minutes.”

The Rolling Stones reveal first dates for 2018

The Rolling Stones have put England in their sites for 2018.

The band skipped their home country last year during the first year of their “No Filter Tour” but have set seven shows for the British Isles along with a few extra dates on the European continent.

1

History

The Rolling Stones were at the forefront of the British Invasion of bands that became popular in the United States in 1964, and identified with the youthful and rebellious counterculture of the 1960s. Rooted in blues and early rock and roll, the group began a short period of musical experimentation in the mid-1960s that peaked with the psychedelic album Their Satanic Majesties Request (1967). Subsequently, the group returned to its “bluesy” roots with Beggars Banquet (1968) which along with its follow-ups Let It Bleed (1969), Sticky Fingers (1971) and Exile on Main St. (1972) is generally considered to be the band’s best work and is seen as their “Golden Age”. During this period, they were first introduced on stage as “The Greatest Rock and Roll Band in the World”.[1][2] Musicologist Robert Palmer attributed the endurance of the Rolling Stones to their being “rooted in traditional verities, in rhythm-and-blues and soul music”, while “more ephemeral pop fashions have come and gone”.[3]

2

The band

The Rolling Stones are an English rock band formed in London, England in 1962. The first stable line-up consisted of Brian Jones (guitar, harmonica), Mick Jagger (lead vocals), Keith Richards (guitar, backing vocals), Bill Wyman (bass), Charlie Watts (drums), and Ian Stewart (piano). Stewart was removed from the official line-up in 1963 but continued as a touring member until his death in 1985. Jones left the band less than a month prior to his death in 1969, having already been replaced by Mick Taylor, who remained until 1974. After Taylor left the band, Ronnie Wood took his place in 1975 and has been on guitar in tandem with Richards ever since. Following Wyman’s departure in 1993, Darryl Jones joined as their touring bassist. Touring keyboardists for the band have been Nicky Hopkins (1967–1982), Ian McLagan (1978–1981), Billy Preston (through the mid-1970s) and Chuck Leavell (1982–present). The band was first led by Brian Jones, but after developing into the band’s songwriters, Jagger and Richards assumed leadership while Jones dealt with legal and personal troubles.

3

The right place

The band continued to release commercially successful albums, including Some Girls (1978) and Tattoo You (1981), which were their most popular albums worldwide. From 1983 to 1987, tensions between Jagger and Richards almost caused the band to split. However, they managed to patch up their friendship after they separated temporarily to work on solo projects, and experienced a comeback with Steel Wheels (1989), which was followed by a large stadium and arena tour. Since the 1990s, new recorded material from the group has been less well-received and less frequent. Despite this, the Rolling Stones have continued to be a huge attraction on the live circuit, with stadium tours in the 1990s and 2000s. By 2007, the band had four of the top five highest-grossing concert tours of all time: Voodoo Lounge Tour (1994–1995), Bridges to Babylon Tour (1997–1998), Licks Tour (2002–2003) and A Bigger Bang Tour (2005–2007).

4

Albums

The Rolling Stones were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1989 and the UK Music Hall of Fame in 2004. Rolling Stone magazine ranked them fourth on the “100 Greatest Artists of All Time” list and their estimated album sales are above 250 million. They have released 30 studio albums, 18 live albums and numerous compilations. Let It Bleed (1969) was their first of five consecutive No. 1 studio and live albums in the UK. Sticky Fingers (1971) was the first of eight consecutive No. 1 studio albums in the US. In 2008, the band ranked 10th on the Billboard Hot 100 All-Time Top Artists chart. In 2012, the band celebrated its 50th anniversary.

5

Early history

Keith Richards and Mick Jagger became childhood friends and classmates in 1950 in Dartford, Kent, before the Jagger family moved to Wilmington, five miles (8.05 km) away, in 1954.In the mid-1950s, Jagger formed a garage band with his friend Dick Taylor; the group mainly played material by Muddy Waters, Chuck Berry, Little Richard, Howlin’ Wolf and Bo Diddley. Jagger met Richards again in 1960 on platform two of Dartford railway station, and the Chuck Berry and Muddy Waters records that Jagger was carrying revealed a common interest. A musical partnership began shortly afterwards. Richards joined Jagger and Taylor at frequent meetings at Jagger’s house. The meetings switched to Taylor’s house in late 1961, where the three were joined by Alan Etherington and Bob Beckwith; the quintet called themselves the Blues Boys.

In March 1962 the Blue Boys read about the Ealing Jazz Club in Jazz News newspaper, which mentioned Alexis Korner’s rhythm and blues band, Blues Incorporated. The group sent a tape of their best recordings to Korner, who was favourably impressed, and visited Ealing Jazz Club on 7 April where they met the members of Blues Incorporated, who included the slide guitarist Brian Jones, the keyboardist Ian Stewart and the drummer Charlie Watts. After a meeting with Korner, Jagger and Richards started jamming with the group.

M.I.A.: ‘Revolution is the marketable thing now’

M.I.A. has insisted “revolution” is a lot more “marketable” now, compared to the resistance she faced for speaking out during her career.

The rapper, real name Mathangi ‘Maya’ Arulpragasam, began her recording career in 2002 and has since had hits with songs such as Born Free and Paper Planes, while also garnering a reputation for controversy due to her activism and outspoken social and political commentary. While M.I.A. has received much criticism over the years for encouraging change in the cultural landscape, the 42-year-old wondered why her words were shut down, yet initiatives such as Time’s Up anti-sexual harassment movement have been widely accepted and glorified.

Right now

@Music

“Right now it’s the marketable thing – revolution,” the singer-songwriter said in an interview with website High Snobiety. “Everybody who spoke at the Grammys is like ‘OMG, so powerful’ about things that are still within a sphere of acceptableness, but when I said things like that before… it was like the biggest thing.”

The Grammy-nominee

@Grammy

The Grammy-nominee, who is of Sri Lankan Tamil origin, was previously married to American environmentalist Benjamin Bronfman and gave birth to their first child Ikhyd in February 2009 before the pair split in 2012. Yet no matter what state she found herself in, M.I.A. felt as though she just couldn’t win over her commentators.

“The whole cultural system of entertainment was so grossed out by me,” she shared. “When I was trying to settle down and be normal and get married and have a baby, they were like ‘WTF are you doing? Why are you in Beverly Hills?’ And then the year after when I’m just totally kicked out of that whole system and I’m poor, everybody says ‘You’re a s**t artist and no one likes you because you’re not a billionaire…” she recalled.

The musician is the focus of upcoming documentary Matangi/Maya/M.I.A., which admitted she found a difficult process and is treating as “free therapy.”